Every serious motorcycle rider knows the truth.  If you stare hard at the thing that you’re about to hit—then you will certainly crash directly into it.  In order to survive, you have to tear your eyes away from the looming oak tree, the guardrail, or the oncoming car that threatens to squash you like a bug.  Instead, you yank your head and your eyes in the direction that you want to go!  You look through the dangerous curve, to the side of the parked car, and toward whatever escape route is available. 

Lots of salespeople spend their careers acting the same way as the inexperienced motorcycle rider.  They focus their attention on their commissions, or their signed contracts, or seeing their names at the top of the “Leader Board.”  And just like the poor rider, they continually crack up on the very thing on which they are focusing. 

Like an actor…or a little kid, the salesperson’s ultimate motivation is always clear to his audience.  Your prospect might not know exactly what it is that you’re focusing on—but he can almost always tell that you’re focused on something other than helping him to achieve his goals. 

Motivation is everything in life.  If an actor is motivated by wrapping up the scene he’s playing so that he can go out drinking with his friends, he’s BORING to watch.  If the salesman cares only about getting your signature on the bottom line, he’s not too interesting either.  He may be boorish, annoying, or even a little bit creepy.  But interesting?  Not so much. 

Successful sales requires a readjustment of one’s underlying motivations, and then a clear focus on where you want to go.  And in every case, your motivation must be to help your prospect achieve his goals (whatever they may be), and you must set an unwavering course in that direction.